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Cello Concerto (2014)
2014 Duration: 28'
Solo Cello and Orchestra
Cello Concerto

The Cello Concerto was commissioned by the Norwegian cellist Audun Sandvik.
The work is a large scale and symphonic work divided in two separate movements. The cellist faces a challenge of interpretation with a massive and heavy work like this. Often the cellist is accompanied by intricately woven orchestral textures, and sometimes commented by a tutti orchestra. Towards the end of the first movement is a solo cadenza accompanied by percussion, timpani, and harp.
While the first movement is quite stringent in its narrative, the second movement is more ruled by fluid and timbral textures.
A main focus in the work is the play between the orchestra and the soloist which merge and divide in different ways throughout the piece.
The work is yet not performed…

Concordia Discors, Etudes I, II and III for Solo Piano (2006)
  • Etude I

    Magnus Loddgard, Piano

  • Etude II

    Magnus Loddgard, Piano

  • Etude III

    Magnus Loddgard, Piano

2006 Duration: 12:00
Piano
Concordia Discors, Etudes I, II and III for Solo Piano

The work Concordia Discors, Etudes for Solo Piano are concentrated and highly condensed character pieces where each etude focuses and cultivates one particular texture or character. Elaborate superimposed linear movements which form complex nets of lines are vital. Different rows of notes are carefully worked out and put together, forming symmetry and asymmetry in a multitude of musical events. The music is often controlled by rigid frames, tight boundaries which the music at some stages escapes from.
The doctrine of concordia discors (discordant harmony) – the idea that the numerous conflicts between the four elements in nature (air, earth, fire and water) paradoxically create an overall harmony in the world – stems from the Greek philosophers Pythagoras, Heraclitus and Empedocles. The notion was picked up in the Renaissance, and a composer like Bach for instance was influenced by this concept by using extended polyphony as a symbol of Gods presence in the world (Bach has a small two voiced Canon called Concordia Discors, BWV 1086).
Tension and resolution, strict control and dissolution, extremes and contrasts are important principles in the etudes.

Concordia Discors, Etudes IV, V and VI for Solo Piano (2007)
  • Etude 4

    Ian Pace, Piano

  • Etude 5

    Ian Pace, Piano

  • Etude 6

    Ian Pace, Piano

2007 Duration: 16:00
Solo piano
Concordia Discors, Etudes IV, V and VI for Solo Piano

The work Concordia Discors, Etudes for Solo Piano are concentrated and highly condensed character pieces where each etude focuses and cultivates one particular texture or character. Elaborate superimposed linear movements which form complex nets of lines are vital. Different rows of notes are carefully worked out and put together, forming symmetry and asymmetry in a multitude of musical events. The music is often controlled by rigid frames, tight boundaries which the music at some stages escapes from.
The doctrine of concordia discors (discordant harmony) – the idea that the numerous conflicts between the four elements in nature (air, earth, fire and water) paradoxically create an overall harmony in the world – stems from the Greek philosophers Pythagoras, Heraclitus and Empedocles. The notion was picked up in the Renaissance, and a composer like Bach for instance was influenced by this concept by using extended polyphony as a symbol of Gods presence in the world (Bach has a small two voiced Canon called Concordia Discors, BWV 1086).
Tension and resolution, strict control and dissolution, extremes and contrasts are important principles in the etudes.
The first performance took place under the World Music Days (ISCM festival) and the Transit Festival in Belgium in October 2012 with the pianist Ian Pace.

Concordia Discors, Etudes VII, VIII and IX for Solo Piano (2010)
2010 Duration: 13'30''
Solo Piano
Concordia Discors, Etudes VII, VIII and IX for Solo Piano

The work Concordia Discors, Etudes for Solo Piano are concentrated and highly condensed character pieces where each etude focuses and cultivates one particular texture or character. Elaborate superimposed linear movements which form complex nets of lines are vital. Different rows of notes are carefully worked out and put together, forming symmetry and asymmetry in a multitude of musical events. The music is often controlled by rigid frames, tight boundaries which the music at some stages escapes from.
The doctrine of concordia discors (discordant harmony) – the idea that the numerous conflicts between the four elements in nature (air, earth, fire and water) paradoxically create an overall harmony in the world – stems from the Greek philosophers Pythagoras, Heraclitus and Empedocles. The notion was picked up in the Renaissance, and a composer like Bach for instance was influenced by this concept by using extended polyphony as a symbol of Gods presence in the world (Bach has a small two voiced Canon called Concordia Discors, BWV 1086).
Tension and resolution, strict control and dissolution, extremes and contrasts are important principles in the etudes.

Concordia Discors, Etudes X, XI and XII for Solo Piano (2015)
2015 Duration: 14'
Solo Piano
Concordia Discors, Etudes X, XI and XII for Solo Piano

The work Concordia Discors, Etudes for Solo Piano are concentrated and highly condensed character pieces where each etude focuses and cultivates one particular texture or character. Elaborate superimposed linear movements which form complex nets of lines are vital. Different rows of notes are carefully worked out and put together, forming symmetry and asymmetry in a multitude of musical events. The music is often controlled by rigid frames, tight boundaries which the music at some stages escapes from.
The doctrine of concordia discors (discordant harmony) – the idea that the numerous conflicts between the four elements in nature (air, earth, fire and water) paradoxically create an overall harmony in the world – stems from the Greek philosophers Pythagoras, Heraclitus and Empedocles. The notion was picked up in the Renaissance, and a composer like Bach for instance was influenced by this concept by using extended polyphony as a symbol of Gods presence in the world (Bach has a small two voiced Canon called Concordia Discors, BWV 1086).
Tension and resolution, strict control and dissolution, extremes and contrasts are important principles in the etudes.

Danksagung an den Bach (2004)
  • Ensemble UNKO
    Eija Räisänen, soprano
    Jani Telaranta, cond

2004 Duration: 07:30
Soprano solo and sinfonietta ensemble (16 musicians)
Danksagung an den Bach

“Danksagung an den Bach” for soprano and ensemble was written in 2004. The piece is a personal reading of a lied by Schubert with the same title from the song cycle “Die schöne Müllerin”. The soprano performs the whole song as in the original with the same text and the same pitches, but stretched and compressed. The orchestra accompanies the soprano, comments on it, and in fact changes the lied completely so that a new piece arises.
The historic and iconic music of Schubert is treated as vague memories of a time that once was. But the borrowed melodic lines are still poignant and vibrant in their strength. The soprano is the controlling element that keeps the music together. In the end the soprano stops singing and the piece crumbles away, there are merely fragments left of melody and tonality.
The piece was first performed by the Ensemble UNKO in Helsinki during the UNM Festival in 2005.

Die liebe Farbe (2005)
  • Johannes Martens, cello
    Joachim Kwetzinsky, piano

2005 Duration: 08:30
Cello and piano
Die liebe Farbe

“Die liebe Farbe” for cello and piano was written in 2005. Material is derived from the song with the same title by Schubert, from “Die schöne Müllerin”. Schubert is stretched and veiled and appears as a vague and melancholy reminiscence of history.
The work was first performed at the UNM festival in Copenhagen in 2006, and was selected for the World New Music Days (ISCM Festival) in Sydney 2010.

Escher Triptych (2009)
  • POING
    Rolf Erik Nystrøm, Alto Saxophone
    Håkon Thelin, Double Bass
    Frode Haltli, Accordion

2009 Duration: 12:00
Trio (alto saxophone, double bass and accordion)
Escher Triptych

”Escher Triptych” is written to the Norwegian trio POING.
The work is divided in three parts, all based on a polyphony of lines, which creates a web of melodies in different densities. Linear movements and scales are superimposed, stretched and compressed. Ending, starting and meeting points are vital in the piece. Lines end, start, start again, are intertwined, and new lines are formed by the combination of different lines etc. The combination of horizontal events creates vertical formations, to such an extent that the vertical and the horizontal become two aspects of the same.
The title refers to the Dutch artist M.C. Escher and his twisted, but yet organic, perspectives and views on the world.

Et Cetera (or Perpetuum Mobile) (2014)
2014 Duration: 7'30''
Gitar Duo
Et Cetera (or Perpetuum Mobile)

The work will have its first performance in 2015.

Kazbek (2002)
  • Kazbek

    Norwegian Radio Orchestra
    Per Kristian Skalstad, conductor

2002 Duration: 10:00
Orchestra
Kazbek

The title Kazbek is taken from the mountain with the same name in the Caucasus mountain range in the former Soviet republic of Georgia. A trip there in 2000 made an immense impression on Vogt, the majestic nature shifts from barren to colourful, from hard and stubborn to soft and luxuriant.
(We were hiring a room in the house of a war invalid from the battle of Stalingrad during World War II and his wife in the remote mountainous village of Kazbek just south of the Russian border. The setting and environment is fascinating, with the ongoing conflict between the two countries, and the road through the village being the only physical connection between them.)
The piece is based on different statements that are placed together as in a kind of collage. The statements are solid, almost fixed elements, which form a strong and rigorous landscape, contrasted with subtle and poetic passages.
The piece was first performed by Norwegian Radio Orchestra conducted by Per Kristian Skalstad in 2002.

Missa Brevis (2011)
2011 Duration: 32'
Baroque ensemble, soloists and four-part choir
Missa Brevis

Movements:
1. Kyrie, chorus
2. Gloria in excelsis Deo, chorus
3. Gratias agimus tibi, bass
4. Domine Fili unigenite, soprano, alto
5. Qui tollis peccata mundi, tenor
6. Cum Sancto Spiritu, chorus

The work Missa Brevis is written to Norsk Barokkorkester in 2011. It is scored for Baroque ensemble, four soloists (soprano, alto, tenor and bass) and four-part choir.
The work follows the form of the traditional Lutheran Mass (e.g. the four Missae Breves by Bach): a choral “Kyrie” followed by a five-movement Gloria in which a choral “Gloria in excelsis Deo” and “Cum Sancto Spiritu” frame three solo movements.
The music is worked out with extensive polyphony, e.g. the Kyrie which opens with a fugue and subsequently a double fugue, contrasted with sections of transparency and simplicity. The music is alternately tonal and bi-tonal, with a tonality which shifts from being chromatic, flexible and mobile to creating the most fixed tonal progressions. The kinship with polyphonic baroque music is apparent in the phrasing and the fortspinnung. The work is highly influenced by Bach’s music, particularly the Cantatas and the Masses. Subsequently the music can be described as a neo-baroque work.
The work will have its first performance with Norsk Barokkorkester in 2014.

Moebius Band (2017)
2017 Duration: 13'
Orchestra
Piano Trio (2006)
  • Piano Trio

    Jon Gjesme, violin
    Øystein Birkeland, cello
    Kristian Lindberg, piano

2006 Duration: 12:00
Violin, cello and piano
Piano Trio

The piano trio as an ensemble emerged in the wiener classic period. The ensemble as such is linked to a great extent to this era. The work “Piano Trio” by Herman Vogt starts with some fragmented and rather distorted quotes from Beethoven’s “Ghost Trio”. The Beethoven quotes are veiled and erased. There are merely vague reminiscences left, as a vague memory of something that once was, something almost lost. Beethoven’s ghost can be vaguely heard, so to speak. As the work evolves it escapes these historic boundaries.

The trio consists of three movements, each with its distinctive character. But the movements are linked with related material. First movement is a kind of confused, fumbling beginning, which does not establish any unity. Second movement is marked by unity and consonance. Third movement is a contrast to the second movement, and is marked by the instruments’ individual fight to gain control. The form of the piece is a bow form. The piece starts with the Beethoven quotes as small isolated “islands”, or fragments, which gradually come closer and closer. The work ends in short, strong impulses with gradually increasing silence in between. The piece disperses, crumbles away. In the end only reminiscences of the piece itself remain, in the same way as the piece opens with reminiscences of history.

Ré-sur-Ré…exit (2016)
  • Ré-sur-Ré…exit

    Anders Eidsten Dahl

2016 Duration: 15'30''
Church Organ
Ré-sur-Ré…exit

The title is derived from the Latin word Resurrexit’ (‘He is risen’). The title is split up and translated into French, where ‘Ré’ means the note and the chord ‘D’, but it also refers to the prefix ‘ré-’ meaning ‘again-‘. This duplicity is emphasized in the music by a recurring D chord which represents what is coming again.
The piece Ré-sur-Ré…exit starts with the resurrection of Jesus, which is followed by a harmonic calmness in slow moving waves. Successively there is a dialectic battle going on, depicting our human struggle, pleasures and sorrows, faith and doubt and trials in our lives. In the end vibrates the memory of Christ’s resurrection. It reverberates as an eternal idea, but at the same time it fades out as an open question.

Sonata in A (2009)
2009 Duration: 21:00
Solo Violin
Sonata in A

The Sonata in A for Solo Violin was written to Norwegian violinist Geir Inge Lotsberg in 2009. It consists of four movements: Preludio, Fuga, Largo and Gigue. All four movements are based on the same material, rows of tones that radiate from one focal point. The Sonata in A is a very personal, intricate and highly complex work. The superimposition of lines form a web, worked out as immanent polyphony. The ambiguity between horizontal and vertical, linear and simultaneous, melodic and harmonic, occurrences is omnipresent. Tension and resolution, rigidity and flexibility, are opposites throughout the work.

The work was first performed in its wholeness by Geir Inge Lotsberg in 2010 (Preludio and Largo was written to Hardanger Musikkfest 2007 and was then given their first performance by students from Barratt Dues Musikkinstitutt).

Sonata in D (2012)
2012 Duration: 17'30''
Violin and Piano
Sonata in D

The work is divided in three movements that are linked with transitional passages. The work displays utter loneliness, isolation and despair, at some stages though deep inner calmness and tranquillity as well as loud energetic outbursts. The chorale “Es ist genug” is quoted in the piece. This psalm has a particular meaning in classical music, from the Church Cantata by Bach, “O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort II” and through the citations in Alban Berg’s Violin Concerto (‘To the memory of an angel’).
The title ‘Sonata in D’ states the ambiguity of the work. It is not in any clear tonal key, but has tonal centers that float and change all the time, and often with simultanious competing tonal centers resulting in a restless sensation. But it is still a ‘classical’ piece in its form and shape with the historical links regarding its citations, hence the title ‘Sonata’.
It is a ‘tour de force’ for the musicians involved, intended to be a transcendental experience for both the performers and the audience.
The work is dedicated to the 77 people who lost their lives on July the 22nd 2011 in Norway.
The Sonata in D for Violin and Piano was commissioned by the Norwegian violinist Bjarne Magnus Jensen.

The Marvel of Turin (2012)
  • The Marvel of Turin

    Anders Eidsten Dahl, Organ

2012 Duration: 14'
Solo Church Organ
The Marvel of Turin

The Marvel of Turin is inspired by the amazing phenomenon of the Shroud of Turin (in Italian: Sindone di Torino, Sacra Sindone). This shroud is according to Christian tradition the historical burial cloth of Jesus Christ, and displays to the naked eye a vague depiction of a man with crossed hands and wounds with actual blood stains on feet, in wrists, in the ribs and on the forehead. In a negative photograph of the shroud this picture is startlingly clear, and the face of a bearded man comes forth.
The shroud has on some occasions been examined by international scientists to find out how the picture of the man actually came to be. It has been a subject of dispute for decades, of its dating and geographical origin and historical authenticity.
But nevertheless, the shroud is a mysterious and intriguing object that has raised more questions than answers by the scientific examinations it has been subjected to. Even after all this thorough research, it still comes down to a question of belief.
The work is inspired by this surprising object and its strange and still quite unknown story. It depicts duality and floating mysticism, followed by glittering outbursts, always with an underlying ambiguity…
The Marvel of Turin was commissioned by the Norwegian organist Anders Eidsten Dahl and first performed in 2013.

Vanishing Points (2009)
2009 Duration: 11:00
Sinfonietta ensemble (9 musicians)
Vanishing Points

The piece “Vanishing Points” is a work of intricate linear movements and polyphonic structures. The superimposition of lines form an elaborate network, ultimately forming combined super lines. The music is shifting back and forth from fragile to massive events.
The piece is inspired by the work of the dutch artist M.C. Escher. In dealing with multiple vanishing points that are twisted, curved and turned around he achieves a world of distortion, but also a world of continuation and unexpected cyclic events when working with fractal structures etc. The piece is also inspired by a picture taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, called Pillars of Creation. It shows a giant nebula (remnants of a supernova explosion, a large cloud of debris consisting of dust and gas), displaying beautiful curved structures, almost resembling a thin cloth of silk, of enormous proportions (many light years in width), but still with extremely low density. But this nebula does not exist any more! It was blown apart by a vast supernova explotion relatively close to it. But since light moves in space with a certain speed, we can still observe the nebula here on Earth. Hence it is actually a ghost image of a non existing structure we observe today.
The work is in its broader sence about how things appear, but not necessarily how they actually are in reality, and how history can be a result of continuation but nevertheless a result of chance. Cause and effect, as well as breaches and sudden turning points, are inherent quantities in the work.

Violin Concerto (2012/14/16)
2012/14/16 Duration: 35'
Violin Solo and Orchestra
Violin Concerto

The Violin Concerto was completed in 2012, and rewritten substantially in 2014.
The work is composed as a classical/romantic solo concerto in its general form, consisting of three movements.
It is a large scale symphonic work, where the violin partly has an obligato role while the orchestra has the conductive structures. The violin and the orchestra represent in different passages opposites which are played out as contrasts, the singular versus the massive.
The work will have its first performance with Geir Inge Lotsberg and Norwegian Radio Orchestra in the 2015/-16 season.

Wenn alle Länder wüsst lägen… (2008/2010)
  • Complete work

    2010 Version
    Athelas Sinfonietta
    Pierre-André Valade, conductor

  • Excerpt, instrumentation of 5th Etude

    Athelas Sinfonietta
    Pierre-André Valade, conductor

2008/2010 Duration: 14:00
Sinfonietta ensemble (16 musicians)
Wenn alle Länder wüsst lägen…

The title “Wenn alle Länder wüsst lägen…” is taken from a Norwegian psalm by the 17th century Norwegian poet and priest Petter Dass. This text is fatalistic, partly panteistic and apocalyptic. This work is based on organic and evolving forms, and on sudden contrasting breaks and ruptures which open up for new musical events. This follows the general idea of evolution of life on Earth. The work opens with a distorted tonal circle of fifths all the way through all the major chords from the highest A major to the broadest A major. The piece ends with the psalm of Dass which on one hand assembles, on the other hand disintegrates, the piece. A longing for peace and fulfilment closes the piece.
The work was first performed by Ensemble BIT20 at the Borealis Festival in Bergen in 2009.
The work was rewritten substantially in 2010 for the Athelas Sinfonietta during Nordic Music Days in Copenhagen.

Wiegenlied (2010)
2010 Duration: 07:00
Solo Violin
Wiegenlied

Wiegenlied for solo Violin was written to the Norwegian violinist Geir Inge Lotsberg in 2010. The piece consists of evolving lines that are constantly moving. Fragile waving lines create a sorrow and longing atmosphere, in search for resolution and peace.

Wood and wind immanent (2005)
2005 Duration: 08:00
Solo clarinet
Wood and wind immanent

“Wood and wind immanent” utilizes the clarinet as a harmonic instrument, with immanent polyphony, arpeggiated chords, and multiphonics as tonal chord progressions. The use of simultaneous sub tones creates at certain points subtle polyphonic structures. Melodic and harmonic thinking, horizontal and vertical, are more or less the same issue. When performed in a room or hall with good resonance the arpeggiated chords emerge in their full duality.
The piece has never been performed.